Rob
----> who

----> work

----> contact

----> links

Robert Selby
----> news


My debut pamphlet was published as part of Clutag's 'Five Poems' series in May. It is available to buy on Clutag's website here.

Poem 'When That Which is Perfect is Come', from my 'East of Ipswich' sequence, was published in the 24 March 2018 issue of The Spectator. 'The Big Guns', from the same sequence, was published in The Spectator of 22 October 2016. Four poems from the sequence ('In God's Prevenient Grace', 'Elysium', 'Tournai' and 'Wilf') were published in Ambit 221, Summer 2015. 'The Daylight', also from the sequence, is forthcoming in Ambit 233.

Caught by the River have been kind enough to publish my poems 'The Firecrests' and 'Shadows on the Barley' on their website, here and here. A travel piece I wrote for Caught by the River, on WS Graham and Cornwall, is here.

My review of Kayo Chingonyi's Kumukanda appeared in the TLS, No. 5989, January 12 2018, my review of Rory Waterman's Sarajevo Roses in No. 6002, April 13 2018, and my review of Claudine Toutoungi's Smoothie is forthcoming.



more comments . . .

[0000-00-00]
Days of Roses

The anthology, featuring five of my poems and the poems of others from the regular reading event, is now available to buy.

Link to Amazon / Buy



The unauthorised use of any work without permission from the author is strictly prohibited
----> sample of work
This poem appeared in the Times Literary Supplement
No.5433, May 18 2007


By the side door her van is parked
and bales lie side-by-side in the lane.
Was she here whilst I was showering,
lining yelm with her muff ligger?
Is it a good idea to call up
while she busies with her withy rod?

At elevenses, she comes down
for a builder's tea and a sandwich.
She stands against the ladder
scratching her gnat-bitten back,
stretching knees sore from the biddle,
braces unshouldered round her waist.

Seeing me in the window she waves.
I wave back, pretend to be busy.
Maybe she'll catch her forefinger
with the spragger and need me
to carry out first aid, play doctor.
But she's done this hundreds of times.

Her fulfilment is no empty cliche
about A Woman In A Man's World.
It's something I inhabit, a warm dry
that keeps me snug in the backroom
when I'm at my desk quoting a line
by Mao: Women hold up half the sky.

[Lady Thatcher]